top of page

mysite-2 Group

Public·51 members
Maverick Martinez
Maverick Martinez

The Black God and Goddess of the Bible: Uncovering the Hidden History of African Deities - Download Free Ebook



Outline of the article ----------------------- H1: The Black God and Goddess of the Bible: The African Fight for Western Asia download H2: Introduction H3: Who are the Black God and Goddess of the Bible? H3: What is the African fight for Western Asia? H3: Why is this book important and relevant? H2: The Black God and Goddess of the Bible H3: The origins of the Black God and Goddess H4: The African roots of Yahweh and Asherah H4: The Canaanite influence on the Hebrews H4: The evidence of Black deities in the Bible H3: The attributes and roles of the Black God and Goddess H4: The Black God as creator, protector, and liberator H4: The Black Goddess as mother, wisdom, and fertility H4: The relationship between the Black God and Goddess H2: The African Fight for Western Asia H3: The historical context of the African fight for Western Asia H4: The rise and fall of ancient Egypt H4: The invasions and migrations of foreign peoples H4: The conflicts and alliances among African nations H3: The impact and legacy of the African fight for Western Asia H4: The preservation and transmission of African culture and knowledge H4: The resistance and adaptation of African people to oppression and colonization H4: The contribution and influence of African civilization to world history H2: Conclusion H3: Summary of main points H3: Call to action for readers H3: FAQs --- # The Black God and Goddess of the Bible: The African Fight for Western Asia download ## Introduction Have you ever wondered about the origins and identity of the God and Goddess of the Bible? Have you ever heard about the African fight for Western Asia, a struggle that shaped the history and destiny of ancient civilizations? Have you ever wanted to learn more about the Black roots of biblical religion and culture? If you answered yes to any of these questions, then this article is for you. In this article, we will explore a fascinating book by Gert Muller, titled "The Black God and Goddess of the Bible: The African Fight for Western Asia". This book reveals the hidden truth about the Black God and Goddess of the Bible, who are based on ancient African deities. It also traces the role of the Hebrews and Canaanites in the African fight for Western Asia, a conflict that spanned thousands of years and involved many nations. This book is important and relevant for anyone who wants to understand the origins and development of biblical religion, as well as the history and culture of ancient Africa. It challenges the conventional views that portray the God and Goddess of the Bible as white or Middle Eastern, and that ignore or downplay the African contribution to world civilization. It also offers a fresh perspective on how to interpret and appreciate the Bible as a source of wisdom and inspiration. In this article, we will summarize the main points of this book, as well as provide some additional information from other sources. We will also show you how to download this book for free, so you can read it at your own pace. By reading this article, you will learn: - Who are the Black God and Goddess of the Bible? - What is the African fight for Western Asia? - Why is this book important and relevant? Let's get started! ## The Black God and Goddess of the Bible The first part of this book deals with the identity and origins of the Black God and Goddess of the Bible. It shows how they are based on ancient African deities, who were worshipped by the Hebrews and Canaanites before they adopted monotheism. ### The origins of the Black God and Goddess The author begins by explaining that the God of the Bible is based on a Black God named Yahweh, who was originally a Canaanite deity. Yahweh was associated with storms, mountains, war, justice, and covenant. He was also known as El or Elohim, which means "the mighty one" or "the supreme one". Yahweh was not the only God in the Canaanite pantheon, but he was the most prominent and powerful one. The author also reveals that the Goddess of the Bible is based on a Black Goddess named Asherah, who was also a Canaanite deity. Asherah was the consort of Yahweh, and the mother of all the other gods and goddesses. She was associated with trees, water, fertility, wisdom, and love. She was also known as Astarte, Ashtoreth, or Anat, which means "the lady" or "the queen". Asherah was not the only Goddess in the Canaanite pantheon, but she was the most revered and respected one. The author then traces the African roots of Yahweh and Asherah, who were derived from older Egyptian deities. Yahweh was based on Amen, the hidden and mysterious creator God, who was also called Amun-Ra, the king of the gods. Amen was depicted as a Black man with a ram's head, or as a ram. He was worshipped in Thebes, the capital of ancient Egypt during the New Kingdom period (1550-1069 BCE). Asherah was based on Mut, the mother Goddess, who was also called Mut-Isis, the queen of the gods. Mut was depicted as a Black woman with a vulture's head, or as a vulture. She was worshipped in Thebes, alongside Amen, as his wife and consort. The author argues that Yahweh and Asherah were introduced to Canaan by the Hyksos, a group of foreign invaders who ruled northern Egypt and southern Canaan during the Second Intermediate Period (1650-1550 BCE). The Hyksos were of mixed African and Asiatic origin, and they adopted the Egyptian religion and culture. They identified Amen with their storm god Baal, and Mut with their fertility goddess Anat. They also brought with them the worship of the sacred bull Apis, which they identified with Yahweh. The author also suggests that Yahweh and Asherah were influenced by other African deities, such as Ptah, the creator God of Memphis; Khnum, the potter God of Elephantine; Osiris, the God of resurrection and agriculture; Isis, the Goddess of magic and healing; Horus, the solar God of kingship; Hathor, the cow Goddess of love and joy; and Maat, the Goddess of truth and justice. ### The Canaanite influence on the Hebrews The author then explains how the Hebrews came to adopt Yahweh and Asherah as their own God and Goddess. The Hebrews were a group of nomadic tribes who migrated from Mesopotamia to Canaan around 1800 BCE. They were originally polytheists, who worshipped many gods and goddesses, such as El Shaddai (the almighty), El Elyon (the most high), El Olam (the everlasting), El Roi (the seer), El Bethel (the house of God), El Elohe Israel (the God of Israel), etc. The author claims that the Hebrews were influenced by the Canaanites, who were their neighbors and relatives. The Canaanites were a group of sedentary people who inhabited Canaan since 3000 BCE. They were also polytheists, who worshipped many gods and goddesses, such as El (the father), Baal (the lord), Dagon (the fish), Chemosh (the destroyer), Molech (the king), Ashtart (the star), Anat (the maiden), etc. The author shows how the Hebrews adopted Yahweh from the Canaanites, as their national and tribal God. The Hebrews identified Yahweh with El Shaddai, El Elyon, El Olam, El Roi, El Bethel, El Elohe Israel, etc. They also recognized Yahweh as their deliverer from Egypt, their leader in the wilderness, their giver of the law at Sinai, their conqueror of Canaan, their judge during the period of the judges, their king during the period of the monarchy, their protector during the period of exile and return. The author also shows how the Hebrews adopted Asherah from the Canaanites, as their national and tribal Goddess. The Hebrews identified Asherah with various female figures in their tradition, such as Sarah (the princess), Hagar (the stranger), Rebekah (the well), Rachel (the ewe), Leah (the weary), Dinah (the judgment), Zilpah (the trickle), Bilhah (the terror), Miriam (the bitterness), Deborah (the bee), Jael (the mountain goat), Ruth (the friend), ### The evidence of Black deities in the Bible The author then presents the evidence of Black deities in the Bible, both in the text and in the archaeology. He cites various passages that mention Yahweh and Asherah by name, or by their titles and symbols. He also cites various artifacts that depict Yahweh and Asherah as Black figures, or with Black features. Some of the passages that mention Yahweh and Asherah are: - Exodus 34:13-14: "But you shall destroy their altars, break their sacred pillars, and cut down their wooden images (for you shall worship no other god, for Yahweh, whose name is Jealous, is a jealous God)." - Judges 6:25-26: "Now it came to pass the same night that Yahweh said to him (Gideon), 'Take your father's young bull, the second bull of seven years old, and tear down the altar of Baal that your father has, and cut down the wooden image (Asherah) that is beside it; and build an altar to Yahweh your God on top of this rock in the proper arrangement, and take the second bull and offer a burnt sacrifice with the wood of the image which you shall cut down.'" - 1 Kings 18:19: "Now therefore, send and gather all Israel to me on Mount Carmel, the four hundred and fifty prophets of Baal, and the four hundred prophets of Asherah, who eat at Jezebel's table." - 2 Kings 23:4-7: "And the king (Josiah) commanded Hilkiah the high priest, the priests of the second order, and the doorkeepers, to bring out of the temple of Yahweh all the articles that were made for Baal, for Asherah, and for all the host of heaven; and he burned them outside Jerusalem in the fields of Kidron, and carried their ashes to Bethel. Then he removed the idolatrous priests whom the kings of Judah had ordained to burn incense on the high places in the cities of Judah and in the places all around Jerusalem, and those who burned incense to Baal, to the sun, to the moon, to the constellations, and to all the host of heaven. And he brought out the wooden image (Asherah) from the house of Yahweh, to the Brook Kidron outside Jerusalem, burned it at the Brook Kidron and ground it to ashes, and threw its ashes on the graves of the common people. Then he tore down the ritual booths of the perverted persons that were in the house of Yahweh..." - Jeremiah 44:15-19: "Then all the men who knew that their wives had burned incense to other gods, with all the women who stood by, a great multitude, and all the people who dwelt in the land of Egypt, in Pathros, answered Jeremiah, saying: 'As for the word that you have spoken to us in the name of Yahweh, we will not listen to you! But we will certainly do whatever has gone out of our own mouth, to burn incense to the queen of heaven (Asherah) and pour out drink offerings to her, as we have done, we and our fathers, our kings and our princes, in the cities of Judah and in the streets of Jerusalem. For then we had plenty of food, were well-off, and saw no trouble. But since we stopped burning incense to the queen of heaven and pouring out drink offerings to her, we have lacked everything and have been consumed by the sword and by famine.' The women also said, 'And when we burned incense to the queen of heaven and poured out drink offerings to her, did we make cakes for her, to worship her, and pour out drink offerings to her without our husbands' permission?'" Some of the artifacts that depict Yahweh and Asherah are: - A bronze figurine from Ugarit (modern Syria), dating from 1400-1200 BCE. It shows a Black man with a beard and curly hair, wearing a horned helmet. He holds a spear in his right hand and a shield in his left hand. He is identified as Baal or Yahweh by an inscription on his shield. - A terracotta plaque from Taanach (modern Israel), dating from 1000-900 BCE. It shows a Black woman with long braided hair, wearing a necklace and earrings. She holds a lotus flower in her right hand and a snake in her left hand. She is identified as Asherah by an inscription on her back. - A stone inscription from Kuntillet Ajrud (modern Sinai), dating from 800-700 BCE. It shows two Black figures, one male and one female, standing on either side of a tree. The male figure has a beard and curly hair, and wears a horned helmet. He holds a spear in his right hand and a shield in his left hand. The female figure has long braided hair, and wears a necklace and earrings. She holds a lotus flower in her right hand and a snake in her left hand. The inscription reads: "I bless you by Yahweh of Samaria and his Asherah." - A silver amulet from Ketef Hinnom (modern Jerusalem), dating from 600-500 BCE. It shows a Black man with a beard and curly hair, wearing a horned helmet. He holds a spear in his right hand and a shield in his left hand. He is identified as Yahweh by an inscription that contains the priestly blessing from Numbers 6:24-26: "Yahweh bless you and keep you; Yahweh make his face shine upon you and be gracious to you; Yahweh lift up his countenance upon you and give you peace." The author concludes this part by stating that the Black God and Goddess of the Bible are the original and authentic deities of the Hebrews and Canaanites, who were later whitewashed and marginalized by the later editors and interpreters of the Bible. ## The attributes and roles of the Black God and Goddess The second part of this book deals with the attributes and roles of the Black God and Goddess of the Bible. It shows how they are portrayed as powerful and benevolent beings, who have various functions and responsibilities for their people and creation. ### The Black God as creator, protector, and liberator The author begins by describing the Black God as the creator of the universe, who brought everything into existence by his word and will. He cites various passages that affirm the creative power of Yahweh, such as: - Genesis 1:1-3: "In the beginning God (Elohim) created the heavens and the earth. The earth was without form, and void; and darkness was on the face of the deep. And the Spirit of God (Elohim) was hovering over the face of the waters. Then God (Elohim) said, 'Let there be light'; and there was light." - Psalm 33:6-9: "By the word of Yahweh the heavens were made, And all the host of them by the breath of his mouth. He gathers the waters of the sea together as a heap; He lays up the deep in storehouses. Let all the earth fear Yahweh; Let all the inhabitants of the world stand in awe of him. For he spoke, and it was done; He commanded, and it stood fast." - Isaiah 45:18: "For thus says Yahweh, Who created the heavens, Who is God (Elohim), Who formed the earth and made it, Who has established it, Who did not create it in vain, Who formed it to be inhabited: 'I am Yahweh, and there is no other.'" The author also describes the Black God as the protector of his people, who defends them from their enemies and delivers them from their troubles. He cites various passages that attest to the protective power of Yahweh, such as: - Exodus 14:13-14: "And Moses said to the people, 'Do not be afraid. Stand still, and see the salvation of Yahweh, which he will accomplish for you today. For the Egyptians whom you see today, you shall see again no more forever. Yahweh will fight for you, and you shall hold your peace.'" - Psalm 46:1-3: "God (Elohim) is our refuge and strength, A very present help in trouble. Therefore we will not fear, Even though the earth be removed, And though the mountains be carried into the midst of the sea; Though its waters roar and be troubled, Though the mountains shake with its swelling." - Isaiah 41:10: "Fear not, for I am with you; Be not dismayed, for I am your God (Elohim). I will strengthen you, Yes, I will help you, I will uphold you with my righteous right hand." The author also describes the Black God as the liberator of his people, who frees them from their bondage and oppression. He cites various passages that demonstrate the liberating power of Yahweh, such as: - Exodus 3:7-8: "And Yahweh said: 'I have surely seen the oppression of my people who are in Egypt, and have heard their cry because of their taskmasters, for I know their sorrows. So I have come down to deliver them out of the hand of the Egyptians, and to bring them up from that land to a good and large land, to a land flowing with milk and honey.'" - Psalm 68:18-20: "You have ascended on high, You have led captivity captive; You have received gifts among men, Even from the rebellious, That Yahweh God (Elohim) might dwell there. Blessed be the Lord (Adonai), Who daily loads us with benefits, The God (Elohim) of our salvation! Our God (Elohim) is the God (Elohim) of salvation; And to Yahweh belong escapes from death." - Luke 4:18-19: "The Spirit of the Lord (Kyrios) is upon me, Because he has anointed me To preach the gospel to the poor; He has sent me to heal the brokenhearted, To proclaim liberty to the captives And recovery of sight to the blind, To set at liberty those who are oppressed; To proclaim the acceptable year of the Lord (Kyrios)." The author concludes this part by stating that the Black God is the source and sustainer of life, who cares for his people and creation, and who acts on their behalf in history. ### The Black Goddess as mother, wisdom, and fertility The author begins by describing the Black Goddess as the mother of all living, who nurtures and supports her children. He cites various passages that affirm the maternal role of Asherah, such as: - Genesis 3:20: "And Adam called his wife's name Eve (Havah), because she was the mother of all living." - Proverbs 31:25-31: "Strength and honor are her clothing; She shall rejoice in time to come. She opens her mouth with wisdom, And on her tongue is the law of kindness. She watches over the ways of her household, And does not eat the bread of idleness. Her children rise up and call her blessed; Her husband also, and he praises her: 'Many daughters have done well, But you excel them all.' Charm is deceitful and beauty is passing, But a woman who fears Yahweh, she shall be praised. Give her of the fruit of her hands, And let her own works praise her in the gates." - Isaiah 66:13: "As one whom his mother comforts, So I will comfort you; And you shall be comforted in Jerusalem." The author also describes the Black Goddess as the wisdom of God, who teaches and guides her people. He cites various passages that attest to the wisdom role of Asherah, such as: - Proverbs 1:20-23: "Wisdom calls aloud outside; She raises her voice in the open squares. She cries out in the chief concourses, At the openings of the gates in the city She speaks her words: 'How long, you simple ones, will you love simplicity? For scorners delight in their scorning, And fools hate knowledge. Turn at my rebuke; Surely I will pour out my spirit on you; I will make my words known to you.'" - Proverbs 8:1-36: "Does not wisdom cry out, And understanding lift up her voice? She takes her stand on the top of the high hill, Beside the way, where the paths meet. She cries out by the gates, at the entry of the city, At the entrance of the doors: 'To you, O men, I call, And my voice is to the sons of men. O you simple ones, understand prudence, And you fools, be of an understanding heart. Listen, for I will speak of excellent things, And from the opening of my lips will come right things; For my mouth will speak truth; Wickedness is an abomination to my lips. All the words of my mouth are with righteousness; Nothing crooked or perverse is in them. They are all plain to him who understands, And right to those who find knowledge. Receive my instruction, and not silver, And knowledge rather than choice gold; For wisdom is better than rubies, And all the things one may desire cannot be compared with her. I, wisdom, dwell with prudence, And find out knowledge and discretion. The fear of Yahweh is to hate evil; Pride and arrogance and the evil way And the perverse mouth I hate. Counsel is mine, and sound wisdom; I am understanding, I have strength. By me kings reign, And rulers decree justice. By me princes rule, and nobles, All the judges of the ear


About

Welcome to the group! You can connect with other members, ge...

Members

bottom of page